Latest Event Updates

Robert Miller’s New Article—Consultation or Consent: The United States Duty to Confer with American Indian Governments

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Robert Miller the Winter Talk 2016 keynote speaker has just release a new article:

Consultation or Consent: The United States Duty to Confer with American Indian Governments

You can download it here:
Bob Miller–Consultation or Consent

Robert Miller is Faculty Director, Rosette LLP, American Indian Economic Development Program at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University.  After reading this paper I am sure you will find good reason to attend Winter Talk 2016 in Tulsa this coming January.  The Landscape Mending Council feels blessed to have Robert Miller with us for this important and engaging work concerning the Doctrine of Discovery.

Click here
Winter Talk 2016
or in the menu link above to register!

Time To End The Holy Day of US Thanksgiving

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Originally posted on Ridged Valley Reflections:


November 22, 2015

Indigenous peoples were thus credited with corn, beans, buckskin, log cabins, parkas, maple syrup, canoes, hundreds of lace names, Thanksgiving, and even the concepts of democracy and federalism. But this idea of the gift-giving Indian helping to establish and enrich the development of the United States is an insidious smoke screen meant to obscure the fact that the very existence of the country is a result of the looting of an entire continent and its resources. (pg 5)

And so begins Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz’s storytelling in An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Ortiz asks folk to consider an US history different from that which is traditionally taught in US schools, universities, and seminaries. Ortiz’s considers an US history told through the lenses of an oppressed people(s), helping US people understand how the Doctrine of Discovery, 1845 Manifest Destiny, and 2015 American Exceptionalism, has and continues…

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The One-Drop Rule, Racial Classification, and Identity

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Originally posted on JustLiving Farm:


November 8, 2015

Remember the one-drop rule? No? Well, either did I until the use of it became common in my life. If yours is a US education, you probably heard the one-drop rule mentioned during your high school US History class. However, how much did any of retain two weeks after finishing high school history?

Many US states used the one-drop rule to racially categorize people by codifying the idea that if a person has one drop or more Black heritage/blood their classification is Black. For instance, with the ending of the Civil War in 1865 Florida people quickly amended the State constitution (Chapter 1, 468 Sec.1-3) to say,

Section 1 Beitenactedby theSenateand Houseof Representativesof theState ofFloridainGeneralAssemblyconvened, That if any white female resident hereafter within this State shall hereafter attempt to intermarry or shall live in…

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White Culture and the Hard Conversation of Racism

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Originally posted on Ridged Valley Reflections:


October 18, 2015

US racism—the oppression of American Indians and People of Color—is one of the hardest conversations a US person will ever have. For while most folk born in the US learn (from people) and develop a mindset that resists racist values, they also live in a systemic culture that invites them to maintain and practice these same values.

I use the term White culture for this systemic culture that has all folk, White, People of Color (POC), and American Indians, taking problematic stances that support systemic racism (while hating it). Some may use the term American culture, but this does not work for me for two reasons. One, the systemic culture I speak of benefits White people, not American people, and White culture speaks to this privilege, up front. Second, this systemic culture is not American but US. This distinction matters for it calls people to soil…

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End Government Days of False Honor and Reclaim Soil’s Family

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Originally posted on Ridged Valley Reflections:


October 11, 2015

Funny (in a non-funny way) how many people and State governments have learned a flag (Confederate) has the ability to destroy justice and people and that there is integrity of removing it from the public life, but continue to hold on to and honor a day ruin—Columbus Day. Some are going to talk about this day of history that honors humanities quest of exploration and adventure. I would not be surprised to see the Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria compared to Friendship 11, Apollo 11, and Space Shuttle Columbia. Others will speak of the day as a day of conquest, subjugation, and genocide. While others will move for a governmental name switch to Indigenous Peoples’ Day, like the City of Seattle did in 2014.

Columbus Day, Indigenous People’s Day, I am not a fan of either. I find governmental days of recognition little more…

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Why Anti in Anti-Racism and The All in #BlackLives Matter

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Originally posted on Ridged Valley Reflections:

15.09.27 Artist Renda Writer. Photo: Huffington Post

September 27, 2015

September and October are months of anti-racism workshops. That is not the case every year, but this year they have been months of engaging, wondering, and thoughtful conversation. I find facilitating these workshops has changed over the last fifteen years. Years ago, folk showed up to engage in this wok because this is something I am supposed to do (and in some cases, they were required to by their organization). Today more folks show up because this work really matters to me and the wellbeing of my neighbors of color and my children.

Some of that change is due to the visceral gut—somethings got to change—that has permeated much of US society since Ferguson and the shooting of Michael Brown. Events over the course of this last year have led many folks to conclude the civil rights movement…

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Pope Francis’ Bolivian Apology: A Call to Conversation or A Religious Appeasement?

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Originally posted on Ridged Valley Reflections:

July 12, 2015

Many hoped Pope Francis, the first Jesuit pope, would take a path leading to a new voice from the Church. I don’t know if we are hearing a new voice, yet, but at least the voice we are hearing calls for deeper conversations.

While visiting Bolivia this last Thursday, Pope Francis apologized to Americans whose ancient heritage is the American landscape. The apology was for the Church’s support and involvement in the colonization of the Americas. Though not a direct apology for his predecessor’s support of the genocidal Doctrine of Discovery, the apology is a first step.

The Pope’s apology calls for an interesting conversation during the coming months. For just prior to Pope Francis’ arrival in the US this fall, church structure is in place to canonize Father Junipero Serra on September 23. Pope Francis is concluding a path begun in 1988 when Pope John Paul…

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